Marine Corps Weight Standards

When you are part of the Marine Corps, you are measured at least every six months to ensure you fall within the Marine weight standards based on your height.

These standards are not based on appearance. Instead, they’re based on your performance and fitness level, which are also tested in conjunction with making sure you don’t exceed the maximum weight limit or fall below the minimum weight limit.

Your height will be measured as you stand with your back against a wall, head facing forward, arms by your sides, and feet flat on the floor. There are no half inches involved with the measurements so your numbers will be rounded to the nearest whole inch.

Your weight will be measured while in uniform but without shoes. They will deduct one pound for the weight of your uniform with either a digital or balance beam scale. Again, your weight is measured in whole numbers, meaning it will be rounded to the nearest full pound.

As with most things in the military, there are waivers available for exceptional circumstances and further tests will be run if you exceed the weight limits prescribed to your specific height range.

If you do exceed the weight limits set out by the Marine Corps, they will then measure your body fat. Sometimes you can be quite heavy due to solid muscle mass and this test will verify those claims. If your body fat percentage is still too high, you will be put on what’s called a Body Composition Program.

Still, if the weight requirements are unable to be met even with the Body Composition Program, you can be involuntarily discharged. Long story short – it’s a big deal for everyone’s safety and well-being that you meet these Marine Corps height and weight standards.

Marine Corps Height/Weight Standards – Male

As of 2017, the height and weight standards for males in the Marine Corps are as follows:

Height in InchesMaximum Weight in PoundsMinimum Weight in Pounds
56 122 85
57 127 88
58 131 91
59 136 94
60 141 97
61 145 100
62 150 104
63 155 107
64 160 110
65 165 114
66 170 117
67 175 121
68 180 125
69 186 128
70 191 132
71 197 136
72 202 140
73 208 144
74 214 148
75 220 152
76 225 156
77 231 160
78 237 164
79 244 168
80 250 173
81 256 177
82 263 182

Marine Corps Height and Weight Standards – Female

As of 2017, the height and weight standards for females in the Marine Corps are as follows:

Height in InchesMaximum Weight in PoundsMinimum Weight in Pounds
56 115 85
57 120 88
58 124 91
59 129 94
60 133 97
61 137 100
62 142 104
63 146 107
64 151 110
65 156 114
66 155 117
67 161 121
68 171 125
69 176 128
70 181 132
71 186 136
72 191 140
73 197 144
74 202 148
75 208 152
76 213 156
77 219 160
78 225 164
79 230 168
80 236 173
81 242 177
82 248 182

Marine Corps Female Weight Standards – Why Are They Different?

As you can see, the weight requirements of males and females vary quite a bit. That’s because male and female bodies are compositionally quite different.

Men have more lean mass than women and women have more fat mass than men. Women also tend to have smaller frames when related to height and therefore, this affects these weight requirements.

In addition to differing weight requirements, measuring fat mass on men and women differ as well.

Body fat percentage limits for males in the Marines:

  • Ages 17 to 25: 18%
  • Ages 26 to 35: 19%
  • Ages 36 to 45: 20%
  • Ages 46 and up: 21%

Body fat percentage limits for females in the Marines:

  • Ages 17 to 25: 26%
  • Ages 26 to 35: 27%
  • Ages 36 to 45: 28%
  • Ages 46 and up: 29%

Marine Corps Weight Standards – Female vs Male Requirements

As you might imagine, this is a soft spot for some people who assert that all weight standards and furthermore, all fitness standards should be gender-neutral since its purpose is to ensure that a soldier is performance-ready when people’s lives depend on it.

Similarly, people are calling out inconsistencies when it comes to age. Since measuring body fat is reliant on age, yet no matter how old you are in the Marine Corps you’re required to complete the same tasks, it’s not clear that there should be any discrepancies in these measurements whatsoever.

It’s an ongoing debate and one that will likely continue as more and more women join the military and as soldiers grow older with each passing year.

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